Photobucket
Photobucket

Become a Fan on My Facebook Fanpage

Kim King Smith Events:
Facebook Button

Follow Me On Twitter! Kim King Smith Twitter

Become a Fan on My Facebook Fanpage

Help Me, I'm getting Married! Kim King Smith Events:
Facebook Button

Archive for the ‘Wedding Ceremony’ Category

Insurance for your Special Events

Rob Zimny

Today I want to discuss the importance of insurance for your special event, celebration, wedding and lifestyle. Our expert is Rob Zimny, IU grad, Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, Shelbyville native from Pfenninger, Claxton and Estelle Insurance Agency in Shelbyville.  Rob may be reached at 317.398.9797.  You may get free quotes and insurance policies with him with or without having any  insurance coverage at his agency. We will chat and try to address some of your concerns for insurance.  Note we are not selling nor advising, just bringing some information to the table. Let’s start with Renters Insurance.  A lot of you rent an apartment or home.    Renter’s insurance is inexpensive and a lot of times you are able to get renters insurance with the same company you have your auto insurance with.  It’s usually about $10 more a month and you are getting $25,000-$30,000 on your personal property (furniture, clothes, computer) Jewelry needs to be scheduled on your homeowners or renters and insured for an agreed value.  It confirms you are getting pretty much what you exactly have.  Let’s make an example,  if you have a flawless one carat diamond that you purchased for $7000 and you have it specifically scheduled for agreed value, if that ring was lost or stolen you would get the same agreed quality for similar value.  If you did not, you may get a one carat diamond coming from WalMart or possibly a check for $2,000 instead of $7,000.  It could possibly not be the same like, kind and/or quality. Gentlemen, make sure to get the engagement ring insured as soon as you purchase it. Weddings, Farm or Outdoor events:  Who/What to insure???  The person that owns the property would need to carry the homeowner/farm insurance.  The hosts are approving the event and the property is in their name.  They  need to look into a one day or weekend policy.  Ideally, everyone would have insurance, farm owners, parents and the hosts.  If the hosts or family live out of state, they would need to investigate with their insurance provider.  Laws may be different and it would be best to research this. Two people that live separately ( both have renters or homeowners insurance) generally would be covered. The insurance company would determine how to split the coverage if there was a problem and it would be the decision of the insurance company.  It is a tricky situation and would take time to determine the resolution. A suggestion would be a rider for the day and they would also have an umbrella policy usually to $150-$200 per year for $1000000 up to $5,000,000 and a one day special event on top of this The umbrella policy covers a year i.e. if you have $500,000 on your personal liability and you had an accident you would have an umbrella.  A young couple that have one car and they are renting are not the ideal couple for the insurance.  The ideal client that would be liable would be someone that has property, value etc  to lose several cars, their main home, lake home, boats etc.  Once the amount of liability you have is used up, the rest comes out of your pocket i.e. your house, personal property, car or more.  Lots of times, prominent individuals especially, want to make sure they are covered in case they are sued or if there was any type of injury.   Ask the question…. If you are going to be sued what do you have to lose?  Serving alcohol and the number of guests helps determine the insurance coverage fee.   Gifts:  Gifts are in a car and the car is broken into.  It’s covered if you have auto insurance.  If you are at your venue and gifts were stolen it may be hard to recover.  More than likely turning the claim in would be more than the deductible. Travel Insurance: This is something you should check into prior to making any reservations.  You need to make sure you know exactly what it covers and if this is what you desire. If you have additional questions, please feel free to contact Rob.

Love,

Kim

Fun Wedding Departures: What will your exit be?

Thanks to our fabulous photographers Brooke Photography, Morgan Matters, Jesse Daniels, Tall Trees, The Studio, Megelaine, and Brittany Davis

Throughout your wedding planning you have envisioned making sure to WOW your guests with your invitations, décor, linens, cocktails, dinner and entertainment.  Each element of your wedding or event sets a tone and excites your guests about being part of the experience.

Have you ever thought about the party ending?  What about the departure?  Would you like to make it as memorable as the entry into your ballroom?  Ceremony or reception, your departure will leave a happy memory for you and guests.

Don’t overlook the wedding departure.  It can be fun and fabulous!  What better experience than to leave your guests with another unexpected, happy and exciting moment?  We have offered some images of past weddings that we hope will WOW you and give you the inspiration you may need to create your very own Grand Departure.  Make sure to let us know what you decide.

Happy planning!

Love,

Kim

Hiring A Wedding Officiate

Here are some great tips from one of our best resources www.marthastewartweddings.com

For a Religious Ceremony
Any clergy person who officiates will want the couple’s interests to be deep-seated and to extend beyond the architecture of the church. If the couple practices the same religion and are members of a church or synagogue, then the choice of officiate is probably clear. Someone who is not a member of a church or synagogue can find a clergy person by calling local churches and a religion’s national headquarters for referrals.

What to Ask
During the first meeting with a religious officiate, start by asking questions about his or her approach to the service and what the ceremony will entail — whether there will be a speech or a sermon, and whether the couple can offer input on the subject. Should the couple choose to add some personal touches to the ceremony, such as writing their own vows, they can ask the officiate for suggestions and advice.

Religious Officiate Budget
If either the bride or groom is a member of the congregation, the couple may not need to pay a fee to be married by a clergy person. It is appropriate, however, to give him or her a gift of appreciation and gratitude. For nonmembers, the fee for a religious officiate can range from $100 to $250, especially if there are prenuptial meetings. Payment is expected for all of the officiate’s travel expenses. Sometimes the fee for having the wedding at a house of worship is taken in the form of a donation, which can range from $50 to $1,000. It is customary for the best man to hand over the payment immediately after the ceremony.

For an Interfaith Marriage
Not too long ago, it was nearly impossible to find an ordained officiate to perform an interfaith ceremony. Today, although there are some hurdles, the climate for an interfaith ceremony is much warmer. Many clergy will perform this type of ceremony alone, or with an officiate of another faith. Couples who are met with resistance from within their own religions can turn to a third, more liberal religion, such as the Unitarian Universalist Association, which is supportive of interfaith marriages across any lines, regardless of whether the bride or groom is a member of its church. Some couples choose to celebrate their vows in the tradition of both religions and have two ceremonies, in which case only the date of one and one signature will appear on the official wedding certificate.

For a Civil Ceremony
A nonreligious ceremony can be just as expressive as a religious one. If it has been cleared with the officiate, the couple may write their own vows and incorporate readings, music, and themes into the ceremony. Exactly who qualifies to be a certified officiate varies from state to state, so be sure to check with the local marriage-license bureau for its rules. Some government officials may perform weddings outside government offices, but the rules for this also vary widely, so check with the local government to find out what is permissible.

Civil OfficiateBudget
The cost of having a judge, a county clerk, or another government official perform the ceremony depends on the locality. The fee may vary if the officiate goes to the site, or if the ceremony takes place at a city hall. As for a religious service, it is customary for the best man to hand over payment after the ceremony.

Please contact us for more information on how we may help you.

By Kim